Monday, February 29, 2016

Rare Disease Day 2016

     Hey everyone!  Today's post is going to be a little different than usual.  I have decided to share a little bit about myself.  I am sharing this to bring awareness along with understanding for those who suffer from rare diseases.

     You may not realize I have rare diseases, but I do!  Mine are what's known as invisible illnesses.  I may look well on the outside, but on the inside is another story.  I suffer from Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Mast Cell Activation Disorder, along with POTTS/Dysautonomia.

     I started this little blog of mine to stay positive and enjoy life.  Even though I live with chronic pain and health issues, I don't let it slow me down.  I enjoy shopping, sight-seeing, spending time with my friends and family, going to the movies, and so much more.  I have learned to accept change.  I am not able to do as much as I used to, but I have learned to enjoy my new life.  It's hard to share this because we {those with chronic illnesses} are not out to look for sympathy or have a pity party.  All we want is understanding.

 Please take time to to watch the video on Rare Disease Day 2016.   It would mean so much to me.  I hope you all have a wonderful day!  Also, be sure to spread the word on social media by using the hashtag #RareDiseaseDay2016. 







Informative cards all about Eosinophilic Esophagitis.:

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome


CRPS/RSD

 

Mast Cell Activation Disorder

What is Mastocytosis?    Mastocytosis (mas-toe-sigh-toe-sis) is a disorder caused by having too many mast cells in a person's body. Mast cells are a kind of blood cell that is located in the skin, the lining of the stomach, connective tissue (such as cartilage or tendons) and intestines. Mast cells are important for survival. They help defend the skin, stomach, and intestines against diseases. Mast cells are also involved in healing wounds.:

What is Mastocytosis? Mastocytosis (mas-toe-sigh-toe-sis) is a disorder caused by having too many mast cells in a person's body. Mast cells are a kind of blood cell that is located in the skin, the lining of the stomach, connective tissue (such as cartilage or tendons) and intestines. Mast cells are important for survival. They help defend the skin, stomach, and intestines against diseases. Mast cells are also involved in healing wounds.


POTTS/Dysautonomia



Thanks for reading!


Until next time,

Xoxo, Natalie



2 comments:

  1. Wow. I had no idea the kind of real pain associated with these disorders. God either will use or already is using you to make a difference in someone's life. God Bless you!

    ReplyDelete